The Technology Authority

We must face up to the dangers of surveillance technology

Nearly a decade ago, the Minneapolis Police Department started mounting automatic license plate readers on squad cars, presumably to aid with traffic enforcement. Then a Star Tribune investigation revealed that the MPD had purchased the technology without realizing (or perhaps not caring) that the data would be public.

MPD turned over more than 2 million plate scans — without any infrastructure to protect people’s privacy rights. Anyone could learn your daily routine by getting your license plate number.

During the recent push to ban facial recognition technology (FRT) in Minneapolis, we mentioned this story frequently when talking to lawmakers and

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Sweeping report details how NSO Group spyware leverages iOS software for surveillance

Written by Tonya Riley

NSO Group’s Pegasus spyware may be actively exploiting the most recent software in the iPhone 12 to monitor victims through the world, according to a sweeping new report from Amnesty International.

“These most recent discoveries indicate NSO Group’s customers are currently able to remotely compromise all recent iPhone models and versions of iOS,” the group wrote in a report published on July 18. “We have reported this information to Apple, who informed us they are investigating the matter.”

The revelation comes as part of a broader investigation into the use

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Exclusive: Scrutiny mounts on Microsoft’s surveillance technology

Microsoft is facing new pressure from investors over its development and sale of surveillance technologies to law enforcement and its efforts to shape the policies regulating their deployment.

Three separate shareholder proposals filed this week reviewed by The Hill are demanding Microsoft evaluate whether its business model aligns with the tech giant’s stated commitments to racial justice and human rights.

The first, filed by the social-issues-focused firm Harrington Investments, calls on Microsoft leadership to “generally prohibit” the sale of facial recognition technology to all government entities and disclose any exceptions made to that rule.

Microsoft announced last summer that it

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China’s tech workers pushed to their limits by surveillance software

Andy Wang, an IT engineer at a Shanghai-based gaming company, occasionally felt a pang of guilt about his job.

Most of his hours were spent on a piece of surveillance software called DiSanZhiYan, or “Third Eye”. The system was installed on the laptop of every colleague at his company to track their screens in real time, recording their chats, their browsing activity and every document edit they made.

Working from their floor in a downtown high-rise, the start-up’s hundreds of employees were constantly, uncomfortably aware of being under Third Eye’s intent gaze.

The software would also automatically flag “suspicious behaviour”

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China’s tech workers pushed to limits by surveillance software

HONG KONG — Andy Wang, an IT engineer at a Shanghai-based gaming company, occasionally felt a pang of guilt about his job.

Most of his hours were spent on a piece of surveillance software called DiSanZhiYan, or “Third Eye.” The system was installed on the laptop of every colleague at his company to track their screens in real time, recording their chats, their browsing activity and every document edit they made.

Working from their floor in a downtown high-rise, the startup’s hundreds of employees were constantly, uncomfortably aware of being under Third Eye’s intent gaze.

The software would also automatically

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Chinese tech companies are using ‘Third Eye’ surveillance software to make sure their tech workers are pulling punishing ‘9-9-6’ shifts

  • Chinese tech companies are resorting to extreme surveillance to ensure workers stay productive.

  • Many Chinese tech workers pull 12-hour “9-9-6” shifts. They now do so under the gaze of the “Third Eye.”

  • Efficiency reports from the “Third Eye” break down how long a worker spends on each website, among other data.

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

At his last workplace, Beijing-born Jiang Yi, 32, knew he was being watched from the moment he signed into his office network.

This was because his former employer, a mid-sized tech company in the Chinese capital, employed the use of surveillance software

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