The Technology Authority

Cyborgs: Inside the technology transcending biological limits

Humans are integrating with technology. Not in the future – now. With the emergence of custom prosthetics that make us stronger and faster, neural implants that change how our brains work, and new senses and abilities that you’ve never dreamed of having, it’s time to start imagining what a better version of you might look like.

Some call it transhumanism. It’s not a philosophy cybernetics expert Kevin Warwick associates himself with, but he can’t deny he’s a cyborg… or was. Warwick had a 2.5cm-long radio frequency identification (RFID) chip implanted in his arm in 1998.

Back then it was considered

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China’s tech workers pushed to their limits by surveillance software

Andy Wang, an IT engineer at a Shanghai-based gaming company, occasionally felt a pang of guilt about his job.

Most of his hours were spent on a piece of surveillance software called DiSanZhiYan, or “Third Eye”. The system was installed on the laptop of every colleague at his company to track their screens in real time, recording their chats, their browsing activity and every document edit they made.

Working from their floor in a downtown high-rise, the start-up’s hundreds of employees were constantly, uncomfortably aware of being under Third Eye’s intent gaze.

The software would also automatically flag “suspicious behaviour”

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China’s tech workers pushed to limits by surveillance software

HONG KONG — Andy Wang, an IT engineer at a Shanghai-based gaming company, occasionally felt a pang of guilt about his job.

Most of his hours were spent on a piece of surveillance software called DiSanZhiYan, or “Third Eye.” The system was installed on the laptop of every colleague at his company to track their screens in real time, recording their chats, their browsing activity and every document edit they made.

Working from their floor in a downtown high-rise, the startup’s hundreds of employees were constantly, uncomfortably aware of being under Third Eye’s intent gaze.

The software would also automatically

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This browser game shows the limits of AI emotion recognition software

As AI-powered software that can identify human emotions becomes more commonplace, a new browser games wants to illustrate the limits of the technology. Spotted by , the Emojify Project was created by a led by University of Cambridge professor Alexa Hagerty. You’ll find it over on . It will ask you to look at your computer’s web camera and try to produce six different emotions: happiness, sadness, fear, surprise, disgust and anger. As you play the game, what you’ll notice is that it’s easy to fool the software. For example, you can fake a smile to trick it into thinking

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